At war in distant waters pattee phillip g. At war in distant waters : British colonial defense in the Great War (Book, 2013) [vs-forum.jp] 2019-03-23

At war in distant waters pattee phillip g Rating: 8,5/10 1987 reviews

At War in Distant Waters : Phillip G. Pattee : 9781848327511

at war in distant waters pattee phillip g

At War in Distant Waters adds a corrective to this view by demonstrating how colonial campaigns and overseas naval actions were central components of a broader British maritime strategy aimed at sustaining international trade. Book Reviews At War in Distant Waters: British Colonial Defense in the Great War, by Phillip G. While the German High Seas Fleet was a serious threat to the British coast, forcing the Royal Navy to concentrate in home waters, the importance of the island empire's global trade made it a valuable target to Germany's various commerce raiders, just as Admiral Tirpitz's risk theory had anticipated. Navy submarine officer, is an Associate Professor of strategy and military operations at the U. While the German High Seas Fleet was a serious threat to the British coast, forcing the Royal Navy to concentrate in home waters, the importance of the island empire's global trade made it a valuable target to Germany's various commerce raiders, just as Admiral Tirpitz's risk theory had anticipated. Pattee finds that trade was at the center of British naval strategy during the Great War.

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At War in Distant Waters: British Colonial Defense in the Great War Book Reviews

at war in distant waters pattee phillip g

Subcommittees of the Committee on Imperial Defence had examined this problem in the decade before World War I. Without trade the British Isles could not operate as imports of food, raw material and oil were needed as imports and finished material exported. Often regarded as unnecessary sideshows to the conflict waged on the European continent, Pattee argues that the various campai. Pattee's argument is also constrained by the limitations of his archival research, which include important Admiralty and Committee of Imperial Defence files but lack most of the private papers from the principal British and Dominion figures responsible for maintaining imperial security. While the German High Seas Fleet constituted a serious threat that placed the British coast at grave risk, forcing the Royal Navy to concentrate in home waters, the importance of the island empire's global trade made it a valuable and vulnerable target to Germany's various commerce raiders-as Admiral Tirpitz's risk theory had anticipated. For instance, in Mesopotamia expeditions directed against the Ottoman Empire were launched to protect communications with India and British oil concessions in Persia; the operations against German territories exterminated the logistics and intelligence hubs that supported Germany's commerce raiders.

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Description: At war in distant waters :

at war in distant waters pattee phillip g

Since international trade was essential for maintaining the island nation's way of life, Great Britain required freedom of the seas in order to maintain its global trade. Subcommittees of the Committee on Imperial Defence had examined this problem in the decade before World War I. These expeditions fulfilled the important strategic purpose of protecting British trade where it was most vulnerable. At War in Distant Waters adds a corrective to this view by demonstrating how colonial campaigns and overseas naval actions were central components of a broader British maritime strategy aimed at sustaining international trade. That's the first 200 pages, then there is some coverage of the war in distant waters but it is pretty superficial in it's descriptions. Their analysis of the problem led to a multifaceted strategy to ensure that trade continued during any war, including ensuring that both vessels and cargoes would receive insurance at reasonable rates during wartime, collecting intelligence in peacetime as to what were the main trade routes and the volume of traffic, and also tracking the position of German warships and merchantmen.

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At war in distant waters : British colonial defense in the Great War (eBook, 2013) [vs-forum.jp]

at war in distant waters pattee phillip g

Pattee Annapolis: Naval Institute Press, 2013. Pattee argues that the various campaigns were necessary adjuncts to the war in Europe, and fulfilled an important strategic purpose by protecting British trade where it was most vulnerable. Upon the outbreak of war, British and colonial forces took immediate offensive action against isolated German colonies, such as Togoland and Samoa. Often regarded as unnecessary sideshows to the conflict waged on the European continent, Pattee argues that the various campaigns were necessary adjuncts to the war in Europe, and fulfilled an important strategic purpose by protecting British trade where it was most vulnerable. While the German High Seas Fleet was a serious threat to the British coast, forcing the Royal Navy to concentrate in home waters, the importance of the island empire's global trade made it a valuable target to Germany's various commerce raiders, just as Admiral Tirpitz's risk theory had anticipated.

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At War in Distant Waters: British Colonial Defense in the Great War. By Phillip G. Pattee. (Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press, 2013. Pp. xi, 272. $59.95.)

at war in distant waters pattee phillip g

Once war was declared, they immediately cut the German cables and called on the British colonies and Dominions to launch expeditions against German colonies to seize ports and at the very least disable German long range radios. Prolonged disruption of trade could cause Britain to lose the war. Prolonged disruption of trade could cause Britain to lose the war. Book Reviews At War in Distant Waters: British Colonial Defense in the Great War, by Phillip G. Often regarded as unnecessary sideshows to the conflict waged on the European continent, Pattee argues that the various campaigns were necessary adjuncts to the war in Europe, and fulfilled an important strategic purpose by protecting British trade where it was most vulnerable.

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Description: At war in distant waters :

at war in distant waters pattee phillip g

Pattee argues that the various campaigns were necessary adjuncts to the war in Europe, and fulfilled an important strategic purpose by protecting British trade where it was most vulnerable. While the German High Seas Fleet was a serious threat to the British coast, forcing the Royal Navy to concentrate in home waters, the importance of the island empire's global trade made it a valuable target to Germany's various commerce raiders, just as Admiral Tirpitz's risk theory had anticipated. Pattee's argument is also constrained by the limitations of his archival research, which include important Admiralty and Committee of Imperial Defence files but lack most of the private papers from the principal British and Dominion figures responsible for maintaining imperial security. It is not an account of the combat in distant waters but a repetitive rehash of the fact that Great Britain needed to protect its trade routes and Germany couldn't do much about it. The result was a resoundingly successful campaign that largely eliminated Germany's overseas naval threat by the end of 1914. Synopsis A Great and Urgent Imperial Service investigates the reasons behind Great Britain's combined military and naval offensive expeditions of Europe during the Great War. Less convincing is Pattee's focus on British strategic planning in the Edwardian period.

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Staff View: At war in distant waters :

at war in distant waters pattee phillip g

Often regarded as unnecessary sideshows to the conflict waged on the European continent, Pattee argues that the various campaigns were necessary adjuncts to the war in Europe, and fulfilled an important strategic purpose by protecting British trade where it was most vulnerable. Often regarded as unnecessary sideshows to the conflict waged on the European continent, Pattee argues that the various campaigns were necessary adjuncts to the war in Europe, and fulfilled an important strategic purpose by protecting British trade where it was most vulnerable. Often regarded as unnecessary sideshows to the conflict waged on the European continent, Pattee argues that the various campaigns were necessary adjuncts to the war in Europe, and fulfilled an important strategic purpose by protecting British trade where it was most vulnerable. This victory over German surface raiders eventually forced the German Navy to use submarines to attack trade, which in 1917 caused the United States to intervene on the side of the Allies. He looks at various strategic options, including diplomatic ties with Japan, France, Russia, Italy, and other powers. For the British Empire, the First World War was a global conflict, with battles stretching across the broad expanses of Africa, the Middle East, Asia, and the Pacific. The British used their global cable network supplemented by high-powered radio to coordinate these efforts.

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At war in distant waters : British colonial defense in the Great War (eBook, 2013) [vs-forum.jp]

at war in distant waters pattee phillip g

While the German High Seas Fleet was a serious threat to the British coast, forcing the Royal Navy to concentrate in home waters, the importance of the island empire's global trade made it a valuable target to Germany's various commerce raiders, just as Admiral Tirpitz's risk theory had anticipated. Lucidly told, it addresses a side of naval strategy too frequently ignored and is warmly recommended to the academic no less than to those only acquainted with the topic. These campaigns have been branded by various historians as unnecessary sideshows to the conflict waged on the European continent. These expeditions fulfilled the important strategic purpose of protecting British trade where it was most vulnerable. He argues convincingly that the naval missions to German colonies were decisive in the preservation of a trade network critical to Britain's survival. At the same time, using as precedent the Treaty of Washington of 1871 which settled the Alabama claims, the Foreign Office pressured neutrals not to allow German warships or supply ships to either refit or resupply from their harbors.

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