The poor had no lawyers who owns scotland and how they got it. The Poor Had No Lawyers: Who Owns Scotland by Andy Wightman 2019-02-02

The poor had no lawyers who owns scotland and how they got it Rating: 6,2/10 564 reviews

The poor had no lawyers : who owns Scotland and (how they got it) (Book, 2010) [vs-forum.jp]

the poor had no lawyers who owns scotland and how they got it

Please me if you would like a copy of this — I will need to scan it. The addition of burdens in the charters from this point soon put paid to that. The book concludes with the author's suggestions for land reform, which are very thought provoking. Traditionally humans move around more than other animals, but in modernity the global mobility of persons and the factors of production increasingly disrupts the sense of place that is an intrinsic part of the human experience of being on earth. That said, there were a couple of points where he is so committed to exposing the abuse that he, perhaps, neglects to acknowledge counter-arguments. He also has the fault of having far too many long quotations.

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The poor had no lawyers : who owns Scotland and (how they got it) (Book, 2010) [vs-forum.jp]

the poor had no lawyers who owns scotland and how they got it

On the whole, a very valuable and thought provoking book; essential reading for all interested in Scots Law and Reform thereof A fascinating read and interesting insight into the history of land ownership in Scotland. How did they get it? The Author's politics shine out far beyond his facts. Please me if you would like a copy of this — I will need to scan it. It looks at the struggles for nationhood as well as for a socialist future, while also charting the lives of Scots who changed the world- from the real MacBeth, to the father of modern capitalism, Adam Smith, as well as campaigner Mary Brooksbank. How did they get it? Overall, a very worthwhile read.

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PDF Download The Poor Had No Lawyers Who Owns Scotland And How They Got It Free

the poor had no lawyers who owns scotland and how they got it

In older charters, burdens conditions imposed by feudal superiors on vassals as to what they could do with land were not detailed in the documents, but this caused problems with Edinburgh. An extremely well researched and informative book defining the unjust? Andy Wightman has written a powerful book that on first publication caused the Inland Revenue to investigate tax avoidance by Scottish landowners hiding behind trusts, offshore companies, and companies registered abroad. There are a few hobby horses in the book, but as Mr Wightman says, the question of who owns the land strikes to the very core our of societies. Further land grabs are also recorded, such as those of the commonties and burgh commons. It will either shame you or anger you into supporting all efforts to reform our country's remaining abysmal land laws.

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The Poor Had No Lawyers: Who Owns Scotland and How They Got it

the poor had no lawyers who owns scotland and how they got it

Essentially, if you live in Scotland and care about your country, I strongly recommend that you read this book. However, the potency of his points is diluted by the book being an exercise in the author telling all he knows about land ownership in Scotland - which is a lot. Definitely food for thought and Wightman persuasively argues that much of the status quo in Scots landownership is the result of centuries of property law tailored to suit and buttress the landed classes, leading to an unfair allocation of land and the need for ancient injustices to be corrected. It offers a vast amount of useful and important information, much to chew on, much to argue with, and a good deal to disturb complacency — Allan Massie, Times Literary Supplement, 14 December 2011 1 2 Chapter 3 1 Grant, 4. Scotland is not unique in that sense, but this book is a wonderful tool to those that want to fight this injustice for the betterment of the common good. This is my land, so those belong to me! This is particularly true of his treatment of prescription, which, far from being a peculiarly Scottish evil, is found in almost every legal system since it allows for legal certainty.

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The poor had no lawyers : who owns Scotland and (how they got it) (Book, 2010) [vs-forum.jp]

the poor had no lawyers who owns scotland and how they got it

What happened to all the common land in Scotland? Whilst I took up the book to obtain more of a political education on the subject, in actual fact, this book is one that every Scottish based genealogist should also get stuck into. Has the Scottish Parliament made any difference? In The Poor Had No Lawyers, Andy Wightman, author of Who Owns Scotland, updates the statistics of landownership in Scotland and takes the reader on a voyage of discovery into Scotland's history to find out how and why landowners got their hands on the millions of acres of land that were once held in common. Can we get our common good land back? Has the Scottish Parliament made any difference? For this, he should be well and truly thanked but there is still some way to go before the historical tendency for the law to favour the haves over the have-nots will cease. Thus we have an entrenched class system in Britain which keeps the rich wealthy and the poor poor. Has the Scottish Parliament made any difference? And that's the job at I didn't finish it because the early chapters basically told me that, some time ago, some people made up some shit about land ownership to suit themselves and their pockets. Lands that had been distributed by the Crown e.

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Poor Had No Lawyers, The: Who Owns Scotland and How They Got It :: History :: Birlinn Ltd.

the poor had no lawyers who owns scotland and how they got it

He tells the untold story of how Scotland's legal establishment and politicians managed to appropriate land through legal fixes. The remaining chapters are much more readable and enjoyable! It's fair to say that Wightman has his own axes to grind but he has brought these issues into public awareness. Andy Wightman is very passionate and knowledgeable about his subject, but he is not a good writer. I didn't finish it because the early chapters basically told me that, some time ago, some people made up some shit about land ownership to suit themselves and their pockets. There are a number of very important points that come out from this book and I agree with him that the traditional political establishment pays too little heed to these points. Definitely food for thought and Wightman persuasively argues that much of the status quo in Scots landownership is the result of centuries of property law tailored to suit and buttress the landed classes, leading to an unfair allocation of land and the need for ancient injustices to be corrected. The early chapters define the legal aspects of land ownership and are, by the author's admission, pretty heavy going.

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The poor had no lawyers : who owns Scotland and (how they got it) (eBook, 2011) [vs-forum.jp]

the poor had no lawyers who owns scotland and how they got it

This is particularly true of his treatment of prescription, which, far from being a peculiarly Scottish evil, is found in almost every legal system since it allows for legal certainty. Scotland is not unique in that sense, but this book is a wonderful tool to those that want to fight this injustice for the betterment of the common good. Please me if you would like a copy of this — I will need to scan it. What happened to all the common land in Scotland? There are one or two example cases where the whole story is not finished, but in general there is a good mix of history, legal background, figures and individual examples. A decade after the passage of this landmark Act, this book synthesises research carried out on a diverse range of upland estates by the Centre for Mountain Studies at Perth College, University of the Highlands and Islands.

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Review of Andy Wightman, 'The Poor had no Lawyers: Who Owns Scotland (and how they got it)' — The University of Aberdeen

the poor had no lawyers who owns scotland and how they got it

It would have been nice to read or see what specific land he may or may not actually own, rather than just reading how many acres he holds. Andy Wightman Andy Wightman was born in Dundee and gained a degree in forestry at Aberdeen University. It is more of a 400 page plea for more effective land reform laws from the Scottish Parliament, and tries to give local communities the knowledge they need to help them in potential cases. Crucially, what kinds of ownership and management will best deliver sustainable futures for upland environments and communities? Now it can be argued that landowners are merely taking advantage of historically poor fiscal management on the part of local and national government. Can we get our common good land back? Nor do these estates, together with sporting estates and privately owned forestry, pay any council tax or business rates thereby receiving public services completely free of charge and ensuring that the rest of the population has to pay for the shortfall.

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